The Best Mind Mapping Software

Best Mind Mapping SoftwareDuring the past 10 years, I had the opportunity to test out just about every mind mapping software available on the market.

Below you will find my favorite picks.

If you are new to mind mapping, before you get started with software, make sure to watch our 8-minute How to Mind Map video. Here is what is covered in it:

  1. Why should you mind map?
  2. Examples of mind maps
  3. Steps to create your maps
  4. Three strategies to build your maps
  5. The best mind mapping software on the market

Hopefully, the following guide will help you decide more easily which tool to go with.

  1. Mind Meister Pro
  2. Mindjet MindManager 2012
  3. XMind Pro 2012
  4. Novamind 5 Platinum
  5. Mind Maple Pro 1.22
  6. iMindMap 6 Ultimate


Mind Meister Pro

Mind Meister does have the benefit of being entirely web-based. It also easily to collaborate on maps. They also have recently added some neat features. So if you’re travelling and changing computers often, or if you want to keep it simple, you might want to consider using this software.

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kyvrbh6Kymo, 585, 365[/tube]

Resources for MindMeister

 


Mindjet MindManager 2012

This is the main tool I use daily, by myself and with my clients. It seems to be the most popular mind mapping tool out there. 80%+ of fortune 500 companies chose it over other options.

It has good features, it is easy to use, and it integrates with Microsoft Office and Sharepoint among others.

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8JhAMufFcY, 585, 365[/tube]

Resources for Mindjet


XMind Pro 2012

With its free version, XMind is competitive. If you’re looking for a free tool, you should consider this one. On the other hand, I don’t find it quite as usable as MindManager, iMindMap and MindMaple.

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=292MFPJXiV4, 585, 365[/tube]

Resources for XMind


Novamind 5 Platinum

Novamind offers many features not present in other tools.

Resources for Novamind


Mind Maple Pro 1.22

This new Mindjet look-a-like is easy to use. I particularly appreciate the fact that you can position branches pretty much anywhere. Its free version makes it quite compelling.

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fp0JLyE1Hpg, 585, 365[/tube]

Resources for Mind Maple


iMindMap 6 Ultimate

 

The man behind this software is Tony Buzan. He is known to have popularized the mind map concept. The maps that iMindMap produces are visually appealing. The branches are more organic and colorful. If I wasn’t using MindManager, I would choose iMindMap as my primary mind mapping software.

Resources for iMindMap

 

Download the Comparison Chart of Import/Export Features for the Tools Above (FREE)

Import Export Comparison ChartWe compare 36 features for Import and Export across the 6 mind mapping tools mentioned above. Download this comparison chart for free now! Simply enter your first name and email address, follow the instructions, and you will receive it by email. We HATE spam, so your email address stays with us only!







Which mind mapping software – whether it is in this list or not – is your favorite? Leave a comment below and let us know!

 

128 replies
  1. Brian
    Brian says:

    Great list with some of the top players in the mind mapping software circuit. I haven’t actually heard of MindMaple, will need to check them out. I personally use MindGenius mind mapping software and have done for a while. Really helps me to map my thoughts and plan for projects.

    Reply
  2. Jerry Lu
    Jerry Lu says:

    Nice list Matt. Yeah, I haven’t heard of Mind Maple either, and will need to check them out.

    Have you tried SmartDraw’s mind mapping functionality? While it’s not a specialized tool, it does offer a handy feature to instantly convert your mind maps to Gantt charts and timelines.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Jerry,

      Thank you for taking the time to comment! I appreciate it : ) I did try SmartDraw’s mind mapping functionality. I haven’t tried converting my maps into Gantt charts and timelines though. That sounds like an interesting feature. I know that SmartDraw is a powerful tool. Thanks for dropping by!

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
  3. Haboubi from Iraq
    Haboubi from Iraq says:

    hi guys
    to my opinion most of the mindmapping software are designed to be used on computers not for printing and publishing so if you want such software go head and download edraw mindmap v6.3 (freeware) and if you want such a software that gives you absolute freedom to creat mindmaps manuly by the way you decide then download edraw mindmap v4.0
    incase you want to use mindmap only in computer and you want some thing beautiful download imindmap basic (freeware) and for fast mindmapping download xmind
    for any question feel free to ask me haboubi92@gmail.com

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hey Haboubi,

      Thank you for your comment and for the suggestions of mind mapping software! By the way, what do you use mind mapping for?

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
      • Haboubi
        Haboubi says:

        Hi Matt, how you doing? I’m so happy that you read my comment and l wish that you tried Edraw mindmap
        the first time I heard about mindmaping was when I was googling for powerful study technique and I decided to use it to organize and summrize the textbook, and it was good idea even it takes so much time and I usually summerize an entire chapter in one A4 paper with both pages and I also print copies to my frinds.
        I use Edraw mindmap 4.0 because it give me A4 paper size to work with so when I choose the font size with 10, it would appear exactly the same when I print it or export the file to lmage.

        how about you Matt what do you use mindmap software for?

        Cheers!

        Reply
  4. Haboubi from Iraq
    Haboubi from Iraq says:

    Imindmap is not the only software that gives organic branches, there is another software which called solution language tool

    Reply
  5. Gregory M Desmond
    Gregory M Desmond says:

    So Matt, if you had to start all over today. Would you use iMindMap over MindJet? If so, why?

    Missing is an anlysis of MindGenius. I know that you covered it briefly in the comment section.

    Thanks for your help.

    Greg

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Barry,
      Thank you for your comment : ) I tried The Brain. It has an interesting approach for the navigation. I like how dynamic it is (how stuff moves around when you click on a topic). Is it the tool you use most?

      Reply
      • Rod
        Rod says:

        I guess the brain is much more “knowledge management” tool than mind mapping. Indeed is a powerful tool but I guess this tool is complimentary of a mind mapping tool.

        Reply
        • Matt
          Matt says:

          Hey Rod,
          I haven’t played much with TheBrain as I really didn’t like the layout. But they seem to have improved it quite a bit in their latest version. And the structure that they use is closer to how we think, for sure. I’ll download it and experiment with it. Is that the software that you’re working with mostly?

          Best regards,

          Matt

          Reply
        • Matt
          Matt says:

          I just tried The Brain again, and I’m disappointed. It is onto something and it has some cool features, but as soon as you add a few links between elements, it quickly gets very confusing.

          Here is an example of what I’m talking about – I just created this map in a few minutes and already I’m lost in all these lines. I think that if they only showed the extra link lines when you hovered over an element, it would already be much easier to read and understand the map.

          http://fluentbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/The-Brain.png

          Reply
          • Perry Mowbray
            Perry Mowbray says:

            The Brian is all about organisation. It does do MindMapping, but its awesome power is managing the information in the Map rather than displaying the map.

            So, if the situation requires (probably in a meeting), I’d mindmap in something different and import it into The Brain to manage it all.

            Your graphic didn’t look too bad BTW: Easy to read the Team’s members.

          • Matt
            Matt says:

            I’d be curious to see how you manage your information with The Brain. I am not convinced yet, so seeing a real example of something not confidential that you can share would help myself and the community further evaluate The Brain. Thank you in advance! : )

  6. Derek
    Derek says:

    After spending several hours learning about and creating a large Xmind map, I painfully discovered that the hyperlinks, notes, and features that work for the owner of the map DO NOT work for those viewing a shared map! Xmind is NOT a solution if you plan to share a map with others.

    We are presently reviewing various mind map solutions and will feature our results on our website: http://compassandsail.com

    Hopefully this info can save others from spending valuable time on a product that may not work as expected.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Derek,

      Good to know : ) I haven’t tried sharing maps in XMind. I think that Mindjet MindManager is a tool that will answer that need. You can export your maps as Mindjet Viewer (PDF). Those are simply PDFs – that’s very compatible, so people don’t need MindManager to view your maps. They CAN view the notes, and click on the hyperlinks. You also have the option of exporting to Mindjet Viewer (SWF) which you can view on a flash-enable web site. They also have a good online collaboration solution, to have multiple users work on a map at the same time.

      I think that with most tools export to PDF, but you can’t view the notes. If you don’t mind, give me a heads up when you’ve published your findings and I might want to share it with my audience and give you some visibility at the same time : )

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
        • Perry Mowbray
          Perry Mowbray says:

          At the moment I’m trialing The Brain (which I really like) and thinking about using iMindMap for mind mapping (where output is to go to a sheet of paper.

          As you discovered previously, The Brain is great for mapping the connections between things, types of things and types of connections… but in complex situations the display is just as complex. And although there is a view mode where you can place individual nodes somewhere it’s not really made for physical output, I guess why it’s web sharing is so complete.

          I’m hoping to use iMindMap for situations where an individual map will be shared / saved / etc. No tool will do everything well, and there is considerable overlap between the two types.

          Reply
          • Matt
            Matt says:

            Hi Perry,
            Thanks for your quick response :) I’m glad to hear that you like The Brain. iMindMap is a great tool, and it produces beautiful mind maps – some of the prettiest mind maps done with mind mapping software that I’ve seen so far. Mind mapping isn’t very good, indeed, at helping you see links between elements.

            Something that you could do is do your knowledge/information management in The Brain, and link to iMindMap files for the “leaves”, for the details of your ideas/projects/problems to solve/… Makes sense?

            Matt

        • Perry Mowbray
          Perry Mowbray says:

          I recently purchased TheBrain Pro (for its online syncing, as I want to use it at work and home and not have a separation) and I’m getting close to deciding on iMindMap, which I’ll use for straight mind maps and can embed directly into TheBrain (if the case requires).

          Reply
          • Matt
            Matt says:

            Congratulations on your purchase : ) iMindMap is a solid tool, and it’s getting pretty mature compared to most other tools. Would you embed your iMindMap maps as images?

          • Perry Mowbray
            Perry Mowbray says:

            Probably as a shortcut to the file with a close to full size image of the map as an icon. Or it can be actually embedded in the Brain file, but this is not necessary unless portability is required.

            The Brain resizes the icon graphics to fit on a text line and enlarges on hover: this gives the ability to give a quick view of the map when needed.

  7. Kerry
    Kerry says:

    Hello Matt:

    Thanks for the article, and also to the other readers for comments that were also very helpful.

    I discovered Mind Mapping via Tony Buzan and without using it I would never have achieved the level of success that I have.

    When I was around 33 years of age I was diagnosed with dyslexia. The reason it was not picked up earlier was because I could read and write; though I did not learn to read until around 12 years of age.
    Before I discovered I have dyslexia I thought I was stupid, and was told I did not have what it took to be an academic. Learning that I was actually intelligent, and simply needed to use alternative methods for study, I decided to try doing a degree.

    I mind mapped all my essays; used it for exam preparation; and also mind mapped the entire outline, and each chapter of my 12,000 word dissertation. The end result was a First Class Honours Degree; something I know would not have been possible without mind mapping.

    These days I use simplified mind mapping in business meetings; for project planning; taking notes when reading non-fiction books; and of course my ongoing studies. Admittedly mind mapping is not for everyone but it is undeniably an excellent tool.

    The program I used when I first started mind mapping in university is called Inspirations. If you have not heard of it I recommend trying it out http://www.inspiration.com/ We seem to share the same opinion, that the best mind mapping software for one person is not going to be the best for someone else. I would not say that Inspirations is the best by any means, but what we know well we tend to compare others with. There are functions in Inspirations that I miss in competing programs, and their price does seem to be very competitive.

    Nonetheless, I will try Mindjet. As for iMindMap, I found it to be counter intuitive compared with Inspirations, and the operating interface surprisingly time consuming. I would have thought that Tony would have been keen to create a program that was as quick to use as possible, allowing for a more rapid thought process when using mind mapping for creative processing. Also, a $59 (currently on special for $29.50) Inspirations is less expensive and I consider better value overall than the $85 currently being charged for the basic iMindMap; I think $256 for iMindMap Ultimate is outrageous.

    If you do trial Inspirations 9, will be interested in reading what you thought of it.

    Thanks again for your article.

    Regards,

    Kerry.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hello Kerry,

      Thank you for your message! I haven’t tried Inspiration yet – I’m downloading it now : ) I think it’s great that you managed to accomplish so much with the help of mind mapping. Your story is very inspiring. You mentioned business meetings – what do you do now, career-wise?

      I agree with you that the pricing for Inspiration is very competitive. And it looks like it has interesting features. Mindjet and iMindMap are indeed a lot more expensive.

      Thank you for reaching out! I’ll play with Inspiration and probably post a review of it at some point in the near future.

      Cheers!

      Matt

      Reply
  8. Aaron Polson
    Aaron Polson says:

    Admiring the time and effort you put into your website and in
    depth information you present. It’s good to come across a blog every once in a while that isn’t the same old rehashed material.
    Fantastic read! I’ve bookmarked your site and I’m adding
    your RSS feeds to my Google account.

    Reply
  9. George
    George says:

    I am looking for one that has two specific features:
    1. Change the Primary Node and redraw map with relationships radiating out
    2. Show/Hide Levels of Nodes.
    Has anyone seen anything like that?

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi George,

      Thank you for your question : ) Would you mind expanding on #1? #2 is a pretty standard feature among mind mapping tools. Are you looking for something on the computer? PC, MAC or Linux? or on a tablet/smart phone?

      If you want, we can connect on a short call so that I fully understand what you mean : ) Let me know! You can reach me at matt@fluentbrain.com or 514-831-6414.

      Best regards,

      Matt

      Reply
      • Matt
        Matt says:

        I like XMind’s drill down feature. That’s something that other tools should incorporate.

        The dim filter is interesting, though I haven’t found a way to completely hide branches, like in Mindjet and other tools. Have you?

        Reply
        • Perry Mowbray
          Perry Mowbray says:

          I am actually pretty keen on TheBrain’s self focusing… so in normal view I only see what’s immediately relevant (parents and children, which can be extended as needed).

          And if I need to see whole branches I just switch to outline view (which displays like a logic map) focused on the selected node: so almost the same as XMind’s drill down.

          I’ve also almost decided to commit to iMindMap, which has a very similar feature.

          Reply
          • Matt
            Matt says:

            Hey Perry,
            Thanks for pitching in! I don’t personally enjoy TheBrain as much, but it’s really a matter of personal preferences. I haven’t seen a drill down feature in iMindMap. Are you referring to the “Focus in” feature?

          • Perry Mowbray
            Perry Mowbray says:

            I use the brain for mapping out the databases at work: which has a lot of “Wow” about it (and is productive as well)

          • Matt
            Matt says:

            That’s quite interesting. Tell me more. Each node represents an entity, and links between nodes are relationships between them?

  10. George
    George says:

    When we develop a map of related concepts, there are many relationships, many top tier focal points and depending on the conversation, depending on the setting, we may want one or another as the focal point in the center. Most mind maps require that there is only one central concept and have all their function aimed at that and refuse to let related nodes become the focal point. They are based on a fixed hierarchy. I reality, I work with many related concepts who are the focal point of one conversation and a bullet point in the next conversation.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Ah, I see what you mean. The only software that I know of that does something like that is The Brain (http://www.thebrain.com/). Other mind mapping tools, like you said, have a fixed hierarchy. I don’t think that The Brain is a mature tool yet, and I find it quite confusing to use when there are several links between elements, but they’re onto something interesting, I believe.

      Have you had a chance to try it?

      Matt

      Reply
      • Rajan
        Rajan says:

        I share a similar problem with mind-mapping software. In all the years of development and all the hype, they persist in missing a trick. We do not thinking hierarchically and knowledge is not arranged as such. I’ve tried “The Brain” but also have found it to be confusing to use. It’s also expensive at over $250.

        I’ll keep checking this space. So far, no one has seemed to nail the main criteria of (a) non-hierarchical (as a design principle so that you can re-center your view on any node), (b) easy-enough to use, and (c) producing clearly-formatted diagrams. If a developer got these right with perhaps some collaboration/sharing functionality, I would gladly fork over $250 for it!

        Reply
        • Matt
          Matt says:

          Hey Rajan,
          I agree with you. Our brains work by association of ideas, and not strictly hierarchically. I use mind mapping mostly to capture and organize information live in online meetings with my clients, and found that Mural.ly works better for my own thinking. Have you tried it?

          Best,

          Matt

          Reply
  11. Nancy
    Nancy says:

    Hi, Matt.

    Thanks for your article about mind-mapping. I love how responsive you are to your readers, and I enjoyed reading your interactions with them.

    I recently started reading Tony Buzan’s The Mind Map Book. I have started learning about mind maps, and I have been creating them by hand. I notice that you ask people how they use mind-mapping. My use of mind-mapping is to express, clarify, and organize my feelings, preferences, questions, ideas, and all the factual information regarding the settlement process of an estate.

    I am not yet experienced enough to know whether mind-mapping will ultimately work well for me. I find so far that it seems more like playing than working because using colors and graphics is enjoyable for me, and I find that this makes it easier for me to think things through.

    For my mind-mapping paper, I have been taping together four blank letter-sized pages to get one large 22 x 17-sized page. I have found that there is not enough space for me, even on such a large page, yet anything bigger is really unwieldy. I wonder whether a software program might have a huge or unlimited page size, so I could roam around while adding all the connections I need on my mind maps. I am now looking for mind-mapping software that is preferably, but not necessarily, a free program.

    Based on the mind maps for which I have seen screen shots, I prefer the iMindMap program. These mind maps are colorful and interesting and flowing, yet well-organized and detailed, so they seem like an artistic adventure. However, since I am not able to upgrade to Win XPSP3, I am limited to a mind-map program I can run effectively on Win XPSP2. The iMindMap program I downloaded will not install under Win XPSP2, so unfortunately, the iMindMap program is not an option for me now.

    What I am looking for in a mind-mapping program is graphical attractiveness and functionality.
    I need the capability of using large or even unlimited page size and many connections without being slowed down to a crawl. I also need to be able to create various levels and connections quickly. I would like the capability of connecting a branch with another branches, even though they may be separated on the page, such as by drawing a line around the outside perimeter to relate them to one another. It is important to be able to collapse and expand branches with as few key strokes as possible. Tools should be simple to use and not unnecessarily complex.

    In addition, I need the program to use radial format; to create different colored, organically shaped, lines of various thickness; to create different colored containers for text and graphics; to create text on the radiating lines (not just inside containers); to import and insert images; and to place large amounts of text inside mind-map containers that can be collapsed. Hyperlinks to other files would also be good.

    In terms of printing, I want to be able to print text I have entered inside of mind-map containers.
    I also want the capability of tiling large pages, so I can print the entire mind map on a number of sheets of letter-sized paper. I would also like to be able to share my mind maps by email with others who do not have the mind-mapping software in a form that looks the same to others as it does to me. For instance, a .pdf file would allow people to reduce a mind-map to view the whole and to enlarge a mind-map to view the details.

    I would appreciate your recommendation of a mind-mapping program that works well under Win XPSP2 and that might to some extent meet my needs.

    Thanks, Matt.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Nancy : )

      Thank you for your detailed question!

      Indeed, I have come across the same problem with paper – it is quite limited in terms of space and functionality. Software allows you to do a lot more. I still map on paper once in a while, and sometimes in 1-on-1 face-to-face meetings to take some notes, but most of the time I use Mindjet or XMind.

      The best free tools out there in my opinion are XMind (their basic version) and MindMaple (their Lite version). It looks like both will work on your computer. I would recommend that you try those. They will do pretty much everything that you mentioned, I believe. However, I don’t think that either of them does “tiling”, to print a map on multiple pages. I haven’t seen any software do that. What you can do, though, is to break down your maps in sub-maps, and print each section on a separate piece of paper. Look at this brainstorm document example to see what I mean: http://fluentbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Brainstorm-Session-Example.pdf Page.3 is the main menu mind map, and the following pages are sub-maps. Makes sense?

      Let me know how your experimentation with XMind / Mind Maple goes!

      Best regards,

      Matt

      Reply
  12. Nancy
    Nancy says:

    Hi, Matt.

    Wow! Thanks for getting back to me so fast.

    I checked out your link. At first I was puzzled. Then I realized that it was Page 2 (as page numbered in the left pane) that was the center or main menu of the mind map. I see what you mean that the branches or sub-menus are each a page in the presentation and can be printed, so this would work. What program is that? I could not find that information in that file.

    I have already downloaded a 30-day free trial of the Inspirations program after reading about it on your site, but I have not tried it yet. It did install, at least, which is an improvement, since I could not install iMindMap under Win XPSP2. Thanks for your recommendations of MindMaple Lite and XMind Basic. I watched the video of MindMaple here on your site, and it seems pretty easy to use. It will take awhile for me to check all this out. Thanks for getting me started on this.

    Some of your site visitors might like to check out Bubbl.us, a free web-based mind-mapping program I ran across. It has parent and child and sibling bubbles that–although I could be wrong– do not seem to be organized radially (from the center outward), which is the hallmark of mind-mapping. I have heard that it is very fast and easy to use and that resulting creations can be shared. Some might like Cayla, another mind-mapping program that is no longer being supported, but it is available at CNET for download, and I read that it works under Win XP.

    In the process of checking out the link you gave me, I learned that you do life, business, and/or project visual clarification for people through the application of various graphical techniques, mind-mapping among them. There are certainly some great testimonials on your site about how powerful this process is for people, which sounds intriguing. If I were interested, how would I contact you for information?

    Take care, Matt, and thanks again for your recommendations.

    Reply
  13. Matt
    Matt says:

    Hi Nancy,

    Thank you again for your response : ))

    BRAINSTORM PDF EXAMPLE:
    Right, yes. Page 2 is the main menu, if you will. And Page 3 is the sub-menu for the Brainstorm part of our meeting. Sorry about the confusion! I created the mind maps with Mindjet (www.Mindjet.com), then I integrated them in Powerpoint, added a cover page, arrows, my logo… and finally, I edited the PDF with Nitro PDF to add hyperlinks to the maps to help people navigate from page to page.

    MM SOFTWARE:
    I haven’t played much with Inspirations. Mind Maple is pretty easy to use, indeed. It’s a good option.

    BUBBL.US
    Thank you for the suggestion! I just tried it, and it’s neat! I like it. It has more flexibility than traditional mind mapping tools, in terms of how many “central topics” you can have.

    CAYLA
    I haven’t found it on Google nor on CNET. Would you mind sending me the link?

    CONTACT
    I’d love to connect and learn more about who you are, and what you do. You can reach me in multiple ways (all my contact info is on the top-right of each page of my website). By email / phone / Skype is best to talk/write. And you can connect with me as well on other social media.

    I look forward to hearing from you!

    Best,

    Matt

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hey Nancy,
      Thank you for the link! I just downloaded it and I’ll try it out. I like how “free-flow” it is.

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
  14. David L
    David L says:

    I’ve been using Xmind for a while now, I am a consultant in Technology Management for banks and similar institutions.

    Using Xmind Pro you can export to different formats and therefore share.

    I have however found issues with receiving MMAP files and Xmind’s import of those – quite often they seem to corrupt. It’s useful that Xmind can be downloaded free so they can also use your maps that way, although in many large corporates any non-standard app being used in the organisation is frowned upon :-(

    Anyone tried using iMindMap as your tool whilst importing/exporting for other products when required?

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hey David,
      Thank you very much for your comment! Nice meeting you : )
      About the import to XMind of Mindjet maps, do you mean that the branches seem to be tossed one over the other – like this? http://fluentbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/XMind-Import-from-Mindjet.png

      As far as non-standard software within a large organization, you’ve got a point ; ) Mindjet is more likely to be easily accepted.

      I have a basic version of iMindMap, but from what I remember it was doing an OK job. Anyone else can pitch in on this?

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
  15. Josh
    Josh says:

    Hi Matt,

    Currently I have Mindjet Mindmanager 2012 but I haven’t used it as much as I would have liked. I found that I couldn’t find the training (too fast) on how to use it and what I can do with it easy. Hence I haven’t used it apart from what I can figure out.

    Anyway, as I’m wanting to put all my training notes in a more visual manner (I’m a visual guy!), I thought I’d re-visit mindjet and checkout other possible solutions if I can’t get the most (efficient) out of mindjet.

    So, I checked out the mindjet website and found that they are replacing mindmanager 2012 to mindjet which seems to be an annual fee rather than a one off which is what I believe I have. Is what I have sufficient, and what do you make of their upgrade?

    I’d like to add that the information from what I’ve looked at so far on this site is fantastic. There is so much I found out from this thread and clicking on the links.

    Finally, do you offer any training on Mindmanager?

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Josh!
      Thank you for your message : )

      Since you already have MindManager 2012, stick with it for a while longer – it has pretty much the same features as the new Mindjet. For the newest release, they focused on the integration with their social collaboration platform, Sharepoint,… and changing their pricing model. But the actual features of the mind mapping tool are about the same.

      Thank you for your kind words! I’d like to take advantage of this moment to thank everyone who contributed to this post and made it more complete and awesome : )

      I do offer training on MindManager. I suggest that we start with a quick Skype call (or I can call you on your phone) and figure out what you need. Would you mind sending me an e-mail so that we can schedule it in the next days?

      Best regards,

      Matt

      Reply
  16. Michelle
    Michelle says:

    Loved this post. I loved Mind Jet…been using it for 8-10 years. However, when I switched to a Mac, I was no longer able to use it without purchasing yet another license. (already had two and jet packs). I then used free versions of mindmaps on my mac.

    I now have an Galaxy android phone, and a Galaxy Android Pad, and a desk top pc, so have re-installed my Mindjet software o my Desk Top. Have fallen in love all over again. But… now that I am addicted to mapping on the pad and the phone, and the mac laptop, I am befuddled as to which way to go.

    I want a fully integrated experience, one that allows me to seamlessly create from where ever I am, thus I am looking for a solution that allows me to share my work with myself, whether I am on my ipad, with an ap, or my phone, on an ap, or my laptop (I can use a windows based laptop if I need to) or my Windows based Desktop. I tried to get the Mindjet salesperson to “sell” me, but he said they were prohibited from telling me why their product was better than others!

    Oh, and considering I have already invested over $500 in Mindjet software, I hate the thought have moving to a subscription based model!

    Thoughts?

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Michelle,

      What about Mindjet + Dropbox? I know that the iPhone and Android apps, for example, allow you to open from and store your maps to Dropbox. But a more integrated option for you might be Mindjet Connect.

      Same As far as the subscription model is concerned, do you already have Mindjet MindManager on your laptop/computer? If so, you don’t need to move to Mindjet (their newest subscription version). The mind mapping features are essentially the same.

      I need to do more research in terms of fully integrated options, but as far as I know, iMindMap would be a good option for you: http://www.thinkbuzan.com/intl/products/imindmap/freedom – However, that would require another investment on your part and a change of habits (working with new software).

      Best regards,

      Matt

      Reply
  17. David L
    David L says:

    So the key question, yet to be answered :-), is….

    Multiple companies and people use different product and a KEY feature of mindmapping is sharing so…

    What are the import/export capabilities of Xmind, Mindjet, iMindMap between mindmapping platforms – we all know they PDF but how can we INTERACT….

    I’ll start us off:

    Xmind
    Import: Freemind, Marker Package, Mindjet MinManager, Xmind 2008 Workbook
    Export: Freemind, HTML, Image, Marker Package, Mindjet MindManager Map, PDF, RTF, Text, Xmind 2008 workbook

    So – for those with comparable products please add to this with the Export/Import capabilities.

    In addition add your experiences using them…. I’ll kick us off:

    Xmind – MindJet import – can lose relationships and end up looking a mess on screen

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hey David,

      The comparison chart of Import/Export features is done! I just added the opt-in for it in this post. Let me know what you think! : )

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
  18. ivette
    ivette says:

    Original message in Spanish follows below:

    Hello I am interested in buying a program to map comnceptuales I thought imindmaps 6 Ultimate, but looking at other possibilities, most of all for the price.

    I need it for my 14 year old daughter has dyslexia and ADD. I’ve thought that a software to create mind maps you could be of help. imindmaps because I liked from a scanned text and text passed is capable only of making the map without having to type almost do not know if other programs do as well or only serve to make the map if you type.

    to see if you can help me as I see you’ve tried more than one.

    also very important that the program is in Spanish version.

    Hola estoy interesada en comprar un programa para hacer mapas comnceptuales he pensado en imindmaps 6 ultimate, pero estoy mirando otras posibilidades, mas que nada por el precio.

    lo necesito para mi hija de 14 años tiene dislexia y tda. I hemos pensado que un software para ayudar.-la a crear mapas mentales podria ser le de ayuda. me ha gustado imindmaps porque a partir de un texto escaneado y pasado a texto es capaz el solo de hacer el mapa sin pràcticamente tener que teclear, no se si otros programas también lo hacen o solo sirven para hacer el mapa si lo tecleas.

    a ver si me puedes ayudar ya que veo que has probado mas de uno.

    también es muy importante que el programa este en versión española.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi ivette,

      Thank you for your (Spanish) message! : ) I’m not sure to fully understand what you are referring to in terms of scanned text and iMindMap creating the map without having to type. Would you mind expanding on that? By the way, with VoxEnable and a voice recognition software (such as Dragon Speak), you can command several mind mapping tools. As far as Spanish is concerned, I will have to check. I will get back to you on that within a day or two.

      Best regards,

      Matt

      Reply
  19. ivette
    ivette says:

    Hola Matt me refiero que a partir de un texto imind maps crea un mapa de ideas. otros que he probado no lo hacen. lo de utilizar programas de vozl lo probaré también puede ser interesante.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Interesting – I did not actually know that it is possible with iMindMap! A few other tools, such as Mindjet, can import a Word document and generate a mind map out of it. However, the word document has to be formatted in a certain way.
      MindMaple imports text documents.

      Reply
  20. Redge S
    Redge S says:

    You have some great picks here! I started mind mapping with FreeMind for Windows. My primary mappng tool on the iPad was iThoughts HD until someone introduced me to MindMaple. I like the flexibility that MindMaple offers, however, I also appreciate the simplicity of iThoughts.

    As part of your assessment may I suggest adding supported file formats? Common file formats open the door to use a variety of tools depending on the circumstances (or devices) available.

    I’m encouraged to see an engaging discussion on a very powerful tool set – both professionally and personally.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Redge,

      Thank you for your input! By supported file formats, do you mean to list out which formats we can import from or export to from each tool?

      Best,

      Matt

      Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Redge,

      As I was just mentioning to David, the comparison chart of Import/Export features is done! I just added the opt-in for it in this post. Let me know what you think! : )

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
  21. David L
    David L says:

    Yes this is what I was getting at as well earlier in the conversation thread. For many of us using these we have multiple clients – to understand import/export options available is invaluable – just knowing it exports PDF isn’t enough as often the mindmap is a work in progress and will be shared and used as a collaborative artefact for the programme/project/initiative.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Which mind mapping tools would you like to know the import/export options for? I’m sure I can get that info for you : )

      Reply
  22. David L
    David L says:

    All those you have in the review :-) I’m sure everyone would find that useful and let’s face it, if it’s not in that review then it’s not going to be on anyone’s “A” list anyway :-)

    Reply
  23. Moritz
    Moritz says:

    Dear Brian,
    I have been reading and searching for mindmap tools to write a dissertation. As such a project is quite more complex and diverse in its sources than normal mind maps, I would like to ask for your advice.
    I sure admit the benefits for a lot of problems and topics but a dissertation has a very rigid and complicated standards when coming to the quotes. We normally use citavi as software for the quotations, material gathering and organisation, but I’m not quite satisfied with it (only for the part of the organisation – the quoting works very well).
    I haven’t seen a lot about quotations in these softwares, which is rather essential and complex in academic work (repetitions in different styles etc., you sure understand the problem). I fear using mindmapping for the organisation but still needing to come back to such programs to actually write and exactly add the quotes would end up in the double amount of work, which is not the objective.
    I must agree, that it works well for organisation but does mindmapping offer the possibilities to really write a dissertation, academic article or academic book?
    Thank you in advance!
    Moritz

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Moritz,

      Thank you for your question! I just checked out Citavi. I have not personally written dissertations with a mind mapping tool. My question is, is Citavi working well for you? Is there something frustrating about it, that leads you to explore the mind mapping option?

      What I would most likely recommend in your case, considering that Citavi seems like a good tool for your research and to organize references, you could use mind mapping before and after. Before you start researching, you might want to dump your brain on the topic, and figure out the main angle for your dissertation. Also, after you’ve done your research and organized your references, you could organize your main ideas and some details.

      You might also want to check out http://Mural.ly, which is a new online visual collaborative tool to flush out your ideas very easily. Drag and drop images, webpages, add post-its, details, etc. It’s simple to use, and would potentially work better than mind mapping for you.

      Best,

      Matt

      Reply
      • Moritz
        Moritz says:

        Hi Matt,

        http://mural.ly looks quite interesting. In the end I will just have to try out for myself and see what works best. The problem with citavi is, that inserting all the information you can insert to make the data more organised is not worth the time of inserting it. That means, you read an article or book and insert all the quotations you want (direct, indirect, rough ideas, pictures etc.) in the program, can add ideas, tasks to be done for each thing (with a progress line that you can change), can organise your knowledge in categories, print a literature list in different styles and you can also work in groups (and lots of more stuff). But: in the end it doesn’t have the visual clearness of a mind-map, which seems rather compelling to me.
        Greets,
        Moritz

        Reply
          • Matt
            Matt says:

            Hi Moritz,
            Thank you for the link. I just checked out Docear’s introduction video, and I haven’t seen any other similar software that manages footnotes / references well. It doesn’t do very pretty maps as you said, but it seems to do the job well. Most tools are more geared towards professionals and businesses. Docear has the advantage of being free. And it’s still in Beta, which means that most likely it will improve considerably over time.

            Have you tried other mind mapping tools?

            Cheers,
            Matt

  24. dee
    dee says:

    Hi Matt, thanks for a great article! I’ve been considering to buy mindmap software for a while, but not sure which to get. Generally I need it for my study and work and one that can export to several documnets such as word or pdf and vice versa. If I can use gantt chart with it that would be great. So far I’ve been doing it on paper.
    Tried imindmap, not really keen on the layout, colours but tbh I havent fiddle around with it too much. Price is reasonable tho about £50/year for the license and no monthly or yearly subscription. Very impress with mindjet but the price is steep. Just downloaded docear, looks good for academical purposes. Maybe you can help me decide which would suit my needs?

    Thanks
    Dee

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Dee,
      Thank you for your message! I understand what you mean about iMindMap, I don’t personally like having to draw, resize and reposition each branch. Have you looked at XMind? I recommend it more and more, as it is high quality software and it has a solid free version. http://xmind.net

      Let me know!

      Best,

      Matt

      Reply
  25. dee
    dee says:

    Hi Matt,

    Yes I’ve downloaded xmind, which I prefer more than imindmap. Although I am getting closer on getting a subscription with Mindjet, but for some reason I cannot open my attachment on my trial version. No answers from their support either. Just for information, docear are so complicated to install, or maybe its just me?
    Will let you how it goes.

    Thanks
    Dee

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Dee,
      Did XMind seem to address your needs? Even the free version might be enough for you, depending on what you’ll use it for. Otherwise, their Plus and Pro versions are more affordable than Mindjet. And it even has some neat features, like “Drill down”, that Mindjet doesn’t have. The main downside that I found with XMind was related specifically with my own needs – I need to do a lot of copy-paste of images between XMind and Powerpoint and copy formatting from one branch to another, which is tricky. Also, we can’t copy the format of one element and paste it onto another. Other than that, I rank it higher than Mindjet as a mind mapping tool, taking into account the pricing.

      As for Mindjet, I didn’t have to deal a lot with their support, but it might be faster to contact sales or call them directly.

      I have not installed Docear. What challenges are you having? If you want, I’ll install it and see. Let me know!

      Best,

      Matt

      Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Paulo,

      Thank you for your comment! I just tried it and it’s a nice tool indeed. It clearly rivals Mind Meister, in my opinion, since it’s free. It seems to have enough features for most regular users.

      For the folks reading this thread, before paying for online mind mapping software, you might want to check out wisemapping.

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
  26. Big Mac
    Big Mac says:

    Matt, good writeup and informative discussion here.

    I am looking for some advice and also looking to publish something for others to consider in their calculation of a mind map product, before laying out any money.

    Objective: I am reinstalling the OS and other software on a computer from scratch and want to keep track of my steps and cross references to web sites that have more detail.

    Situation: I am using the free version of XMind. The layout and interface is great. I like the “Logic Chart” layout for each note, as it fixes the nodes to a format (vs spinning with each branch added), and it automatically adds numbers to each node (e.g. 1.1, 1.1.1, 1.1.2, 1.1.2.1). I now have somewhere between 250 and 300 nodes. When I export the map, with the notes, the resulting spreadsheet is 3100 lines long. It seems as big as this sample they publish (imagine all the branches to the right instead):
    http://www.xmind.net/m/uTwS/

    Problem: I am nearly complete, but I can no longer save any changes!! The file is 42MB. I deleted several branches, but the file size remains the same (seems it retains it’s “shell” size regardless). I googled the problem and this seems to be a common issue, and with some suggested tweaks the problem is not resolved. As I gather from XMind support responses, it is a fundamental issue with how they use JAVA and manage application memory, and its seems not easily fixed, as this problem has been around for some time.

    I am running Win 7 with 8GB RAM and i5 CPU, so am not lacking on reasonable capacity for processing this stuff. As a point of reference, I’ve used MS Project with thousands of lines and no serious such problem, though might be sluggish on lesser computers.

    Advice Request: Which of the tools you reviewed or recently worked with can handle up to 300 or so nodes with embedded notes and links? And, of those, which provide a similar format to the XMind “Logic Chart”, with auto numbering, if any?

    MindMeister found a faq that says they support 5000 nodes (unclear if this applies to offline mode operation too), but it is unclear on their website if they support the format or similar.

    Mindjet does seem to have a limit, possibly smaller than the limit I encountered with XMind…
    https://community.mindjet.com/mindjet/topics/cannot_save_map_not_enough_space_error

    Novamind is a reasonable price, but their website is NOT user friendly and could not find anything close to explaining what I want to know…not leaving a good impression on me for their product.

    MindMaple – great price, but very sparse website. Cannot tell if it supports my needs, but might be worth a try

    iMindMap – if the “Freedom” online version has the features, may be a reasonable price, but hard to tell from the examples in their gallery if what I need is covered.

    Would appreciate your feedback/suggestions.

    Reply
    • Big Mac
      Big Mac says:

      Also, now that I have such a large XMind map, would be nice if I could import that into the recommended program, as it would save a ton of work.

      Reply
      • Matt
        Matt says:

        As for import/export, I invite you to download the chart above in the bottom of the content of this post. I haven’t found a tool that does import/export perfectly, but some do it better than others. You might have to go through Mindjet, as it is the most supported format. So you’d first export to mindjet, then import into the other tool the mindjet file.

        Reply
    • Big Mac
      Big Mac says:

      Just checked out TheBrain. Don’t think it is a fit for formatting.

      However, I do like the “word cloud” style for displaying the relationships between topics / info sources. It is almost what I am looking for as a tool for research that can combine documents I have and web sites I find. However, it does not look like it searches inside the files or the web pages (e.g. like a google web or copernic desktop search), correct? If it did so, like Delicious, Diigo, Evernote, Zotero then it could approach being one killer app.

      Reply
      • Matt
        Matt says:

        I haven’t used The Brain much, only to test it out, and I did not like it at all. The concept is good, but I found it practically unusable. The best tool for search, as far as I know, is Mindjet.

        Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Why do you need all those nodes on the same mind map? Would it not be easier to understand by breaking it down in a few mind maps anyway? I personally never have more than 5 to 9 main branches, and roughly 50-100 nodes per map.

      XMind allows you to easily create sub-maps with the New Sheet from Topic feature (in the Insert menu). It adds a sheet in the same workbook. If the memory problem happens with this as well (because even if you break down your map in multiple sheets, it is still just one file), then you can create one workbook (file) per map.

      MindMeister only offers a mind map structure, not the right map (Logic Chart) structure.

      As far as I know, iMindMap does not do auto-numbering, nor “logic charts”.

      My trial version of Novamind is over, so I unfortunately can’t test it out.

      I never came across this problem with Mindjet, for the reason that I mentioned above. You might want to download the trial versions of MindMaple, Novamind and iMindMap to test it out. How about simply sending an email to the support or sales of each of those tools? You should get an answer quickly.

      Reply
      • Big Mac
        Big Mac says:

        Matt, thanks for your replies. After a few days of my original posts, I found a “solution” (or maybe just a “workaround”) to the problem on XMind.

        I had to edit the XMind.ini file and enter these three parameters (in case someone else is looking for a way to fix this):

        -XX:MaxPermSize=256M
        -Xms1G
        -Xmx1G

        It took a bit of trial and error, as I found references to this on generic Java discussions regarding memory errors (on sites not related to XMind). FYI…I had failures with MaxPermSize=1G, so I left it at 256M. The above may help many with relatively current machines. I am running 8GB ram on an i5 CPU. Not sure if older machines can handle it as well, but one could step it down to something less than the 1024M=1G I have it at.

        I have since added many more nodes, and it works fine saving, no slow downs, no freezing.

        Why so many nodes on one map, you ask? Largely because I know many of the actual relationships, but not necessarily the optimal order between them all. And, I am capturing some level of details so as to not have to look-up and re-read everything again while I am executing the instructions.

        If I had them on separate maps, and if I wanted to move a leg, I supposed, at best, I’d have two maps open and would have to cut and paste from one to the other. At worst, I might not be able to open both simultaneously, therefore, cannot move a node.

        I’ve not tested this to see. Once I am comfortable with the high level placement, I will split it up. Right now I’m still adding and moving some things around.

        Creating separate sheets did not alleviate the memory problem. “New Sheet from Topic” makes it dead simple, but it does not remove the nodes down that branch in the original sheet. Worse, neither do changes made to one or the other get replicated in the opposing sheet, rendering that “link” unusable. This is a known fundamental problem of this feature for XMind for some time and it has not been addressed yet.

        As for export, I am limited to Text or FreeMind formats. The rest generate a “Buy Now” upgrade pop up. And, FreeMind gives some kind of error when it is triggered by XMind to run during the export process (in attempting to convert to the version of Freemind that I have installed – the latest). So, that leaves Text only.

        I did try MindMaple while I was still searching for a fix. It looks interesting, but it did not have the Logic Chart with automatic numbering that I was needing. What I did like was the easier hyperlinking to web sites. Right now I paste the HTTP links into the Notes view of XMind for each node – I find it easier as I am entering notes along with that, and it saves on the size of the “tree”.

        Would MindJet X5 Pro have this feature (Logic Chart and auto numbering)? I might be able to get my hands on that, plus I understand that, even though it is older, it has more features than XMind Pro does today. Correct?

        Reply
        • Matt
          Matt says:

          Hey,
          Thank you for the update! It’s great that you found a fix for XMind, and thank you for sharing it here : )

          You can easily move branches from one sheet to another, or one workbook to another, but I understand what you’re saying.

          The New Sheet from Topic indeed does not delete the sub-branches of the branch you applied it to. You need to delete them yourself because they are now in that new sheet. It is simply an easy way to break down your map in smaller chunks.

          Good question about Mindjet X5. I unfortunately cannot answer your question, and couldn’t find an answer online either.

          Best,

          Matt

          Reply
        • Big Mac
          Big Mac says:

          Update on XMind Java memory issue…

          After last night’s nightly rebooting, no longer could open the big XMind map. For others who may encounter this, to fix, I did these steps:

          1) Uninstalled Java (even though was current) and re-downloaded and re-installed.
          2) Uninstalled XMind and re-downloaded and re-installed.
          3) Edited the ini file, per the above parms
          4) Made sure no other apps that might use Java are running – e.g. browser, (who knows about MS Services though)
          5) Started XMind using the application icon (vs double clicking the map icon)
          6) Open the map from within XMind

          Not sure if the first two steps are required, but I wanted to make sure rather than do this with multiple iterations. For some reason, opening the map directly causes problems, but opening from within XMind, once the application is running doesn’t.

          After starting XMind, other apps can be started, and XMind does not seem to mind – just don’t try to close and restart XMind while those apps are running.

          Running Task Manager (hit CTRL-ALT-DEL), under the Performance Tab I see that starting XMind uses up about 0.5GB, then loading the map pushes that up by another 1.0GB, for a total memory use of 1.5GB.

          With the parms set to 2GB, not sure why there should be a problem. With Firefox running while I type this, total mem in use is 3.55GB, after accounting for cached memory, it reports that 2.5GB is free on my 8GB machine.

          Surprisingly, the map file itself is only about 100MB!! So there looks like some opportunity for some memory efficiency.

          I don’t know enough to understand why it does not “see” the rest of the memory, nor not use up the remaining 0.5GB (of 2GB specified via the parms in the ini).

          Either XMind chose the wrong platform to program this on, or they don’t have the skills to make this robust. Nor do they seem to have some basics nailed, for instance, to run a pre-emptive check to enable a more elegant exit on memory based failure. Instead, in this case, they leave the user to guess what to do, and to delve deep into programmer territory to solve.

          None of this speaks well of what to expect in the paid version of XMind, unfortunately, as it seems to have a good balance of function, usability, and intuitive interface otherwise.

          Reply
          • Big Mac
            Big Mac says:

            NEW UPDATE:

            This is just inexcusable…

            I am now in a position to split apart the file. As mentioned earlier, my original is over 100MB. Once I started copying topic branches and pasting to a brand new map each (I had to open and close after each iteration, closing the original before pasting to new), I noticed that the resultant map files were tiny in comparison – I ended up with six files ranging from 200KB to 2000KB in size!!

            Seeing that, I decided to combine them all back into a single brand new map…file size is 4800KB=4.8MB!!!

            It seems that it must retain each and every change you ever make – not that you can “undo” every single step back to the point where you first created the map.

            Even I, with limited technical skill, know that is very poor design!!

            No problem now opening up the complete map with multiple applications open. I left the parms in place though, just to have the “headroom”.

            Not sure I could have achieved this in one cut and paste given the memory issue. At this point, I don’t want to bother testing that.

            Hope this all helps someone who runs into the same / similar issue! It was very hard finding anything helpful out there specific to this problem. But this site seems to have a good presence on google and has a quality discussion going here along with an engaged “mind map master” in Matt.

            Thanks Matt for providing this platform.

          • Big Mac
            Big Mac says:

            It is worse than I thought. Just discovered today that my original, which I copied as a backup prior to breaking it apart, as I describe above, grew by 4MB. The only change was contracting the major branches (via the little +, – buttons by the task label) as I went along and copied them to new files each.

            Those changes drove an increase in file size as great as the size of the copy pasted reconstituted file.

            As I said, the XMind design if majorly flawed.

            I am stuck as there is no easy way to convert all that work to another mapping tool without buying XMind…talk about a Hobson’s Choice or is it a Catch-22?

          • Matt
            Matt says:

            Hey,

            I am impressed with how much thought and experimentation you put into fixing these issues! I just sent an email to Stephen Zhu and the support team at XMind, so that they can respond to this directly on the thread.

            Have you tried copy-pasting branches directly into another mind mapping software? There is some compatibility.

            Matt

    • stephen
      stephen says:

      Hi

      Your this big file size may be caused by the revision feature. Every time you click save button or ctrl+s, xmind 2012 will save a revision in this .xmind file. You can check in the editing history view, ( file — editing history )
      You can delete old revisions to reduce the file size. BTW, you’re using the XMind 2012 SE (v3.3.1), yes? In this version, you can even disable this feature in this view.

      Reply
  27. Dias
    Dias says:

    Hello Matt. I need a program to export all “sheets” at once forming a sort of “book” (one single pdf file with all the “layers” of the map).
    I make maps to study and I’m always changing them. Currently I use XMind and create branches as you said above, creating new “sheets” from existing ones, but the only export to pdf XMind one “sheet” each time. For me not worth staying exporting one by one and stick it together, because as I am always updating’ll get “lost.”
    Currently I have to export one by one and come joining with the software “PDFGiosPSM”, but as I said it is not feasible for me.
    Do you know any software which exports all “sheets” of the map at once placing each “sheet” on a separate sheet as you did in the example above? I need this option because then I can update parts of the map and export everything at once without having to put it all together again one by one.
    I’m from Brazil and do not speak English very well, I hope you understand …
    Thank you for your attention.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Dias,

      I do not personally know of a software which experts all sheets at once in a multi-page PDF. I use mostly Mindjet with my clients, and generate one bitmap per map, then join them together in Powerpoint. I add a cover page and hyperlinks between pages, then export it to a high-resolution PDF.

      I sometimes also use Nitro PDF to join PDFs together when I exported directly to PDFs.

      Why do you say that this is not an option for you? Can you backup your previous version of your book before creating a new version from your latest changes?

      Reply
      • Dias
        Dias says:

        Hello Matt.
        The maps that do are like “chips” for memorization, so from a central theme arise many, many ramifications. That’s why I wanted a program that would export the whole set.
        Currently I am printing a “sheet” each time through the “DoroPDF” and joining the “PDFGios” (think very practical), but every time I change a single sheet (or create new ones with new notes) will have to print all again (one by one) and merge back into a single file (merge is fast, “print” it takes more time).
        Until I got the hang and do it faster than at the beginning, but if I had a software that would export all at once would be more practical.
        For now the way I have a little more work with the “XMind” even, but either way I think it will be worth it.
        Thank you very much for your attention.

        Reply
        • Matt
          Matt says:

          Hello Dias,

          I understand. You could perhaps create a Word table of contents, which links to individual PDFs. You could then only update the table of contents whenever you add a new map. It’s still not ideal. I am not aware of any good solution for this.

          Best,

          Matt

          Reply
  28. Claudio
    Claudio says:

    Hi Matt.

    Do you know if exist another mind mapping software than Mindjet that could convert the map to .swf?

    Reply
  29. Tereza
    Tereza says:

    Hi Matt

    Great reviews and comments. Very useful site.

    I wanted your opinion on the best software which combines both mind mapping and gantt charts.

    Ideally I would also like to be able to edit the gantt chart directly i.e. not have to change the mind map to update the gantt chart. The perfect tool would be able to update the gantt which would be reflected in the mind map and vice versa.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks for your time.

    Cheers,

    Tereza

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Tereza,

      Both Mindjet and XMind allow you to edit both the mind map and the GANTT chart, and the changes are reflected in the other. I am not aware of other tools that do quite the same. Let me know if you discover other tools that do the same, and whether this answers your question : )

      Cheers,

      Matt

      Reply
  30. spb
    spb says:

    i wish freemind had timeline/ gantt chart/ matrix features and mindview gave those features in its free version…mindview costs like a 100$ a year :O

    subtask app on chrome webstore is good but has serious limitations wrt number of tasks & projects u can add in the free version

    it is so hard to find a mind mapping software with task management feature which can sync to calender view (preferably google calender) and/or outlook calender… with a timeline view..
    additionally: export standard office as outline/ wbs views is always helpful

    i had checked vue which gives good presentation options though but lacks the rest all features

    can anyone suggest something like this which is available in opensource or free versions of the mindmapping/ concept mapping applications/ softwares?

    Reply
  31. Suzain Watson
    Suzain Watson says:

    A great alternative to MindMup for mac and pc is ConceptDraw. It is a desktop based tool that integrates with many apps and services like Skype, Evernote, Twitter and supports different formats allowing effective collaboration when working in groups. I highly recommend giving it a try: Pimki Review

    Reply
  32. ELena
    ELena says:

    I’m so angry at Mindmeister now. I’ve been working on a very complex mind map for my job, spent 10 hours on it to finally discover it got lost. I hate this software. Hate it.

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      Hi Elena,
      That’s horrible! I’m sorry to hear that. Do you know what happened? Have you contacted them to see if they can recuperate your work?

      Reply
  33. Range
    Range says:

    Hola! I’ve been following your website for a while now and
    finally got the bravery to go ahead and give you a shout out from Atascocita
    Texas! Just wanted to mention keep up the excellent
    work!

    Reply
  34. Henry Gurr
    Henry Gurr says:

    Hey Matt

    I’m VERY much like the person I quote below:

    You have here “A Great Mind Mapping Resource”!!! :

    Thanks VERY MUCH:
    *********************************************

    Here is some information your and your readers may be able to use Re XMInd:

    1) I use Xmind to show a VERY large (x,Y) Table Showing a MATRIX (ie a ‘Chart’) of ~22 AUTHORS placed in rows, moving down, and ~44 IDEA Columns, moving to the right.

    2) Y’All Are Invited To Study “My (x,y) Table Of Author Idea Comparisons:” Here
    http://www.xmind.net/m/Zy8X/

    3) Since the captions there, are VERY HARD to Read, you can find an easier to read version of this text here
    http://venturearete.org/ResearchProjects/ProfessorGurr/Documents/InfoAuthorMatrix

    4) You perhaps will find much of interest on this site,, but at the Upper Left of this page you will see TWO ADDITIONAL Menu Items You-All will also be interested in: Such as

    a) Hopfield Model Our Gen Problem Solver Brain Seek Best Q

    b) Xmind Mapping App: H Gurr’s User’s Guide Hints & Helps
    *********************************************

    Sincerely Henry Gurr M Email Address is here:
    http://www.usca.edu/math/~mathdept/hsg/

    ********** Earlier Post That I Entirely AGREE with *********
    QUOTE:
    Admiring the time and effort you put into your website and in depth information you present. It’s good to come across a blog every once in a while that isn’t the same old rehashed material. Fantastic read! I’ve bookmarked your site and I’m adding your RSS feeds to my Google account. – See more at: http://fluentbrain.com/blog/the-best-mind-mapping-software/#sthash.ZkkTEDMY.dpuf

    ********** END QUOTE ******************

    Reply
  35. Mayank
    Mayank says:

    Currently i am using Xmind. Today, i came to know abt imindmap while reading Tony Buzan’s The Mind Map Book & searching him on net. Is imindmap better than Xmind in any way?

    Reply
    • Matt
      Matt says:

      I wouldn’t say that iMindMap is better, considering that XMind has an interesting free version. iMindMap does semi-3D maps, and has a few other features that XMind doesn’t have. It really depends what’s important to you.

      Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. [...] in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, most pieces of mind mapping software work, as well as how a mind map is [...]

  2. [...] Best Mind Mapping Software: Mindjet MindManager, iMindMap, MindMaple and XMind Mindjet MindManager [...]

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